Dyson 360 Eye vs. iRobot Roomba 980: Which Robot Vacuum is Superior?

A side-by-side comparison of the Dyson 360 Eye and iRobot Roomba 980 robot vacuums.

Photo Caption: How does the new Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum (left) stack up against iRobot's Roomba 980? Check out the side-by-side comparison below.

When it comes to robot vacuums, iRobot‘s Roomba is by far the market leader. The Roomba was first introduced in 2002 and has sold more than 14 million units worldwide.

The latest version introduced in Sept. 2015, the Roomba 980, is iRobot’s first cloud-connected consumer robot, allowing users to connect, manage, and monitor it through iRobot’s new HOME App on Android and iOS devices. Using iAdapt 2.0 software and two new sensors, the Roomba 980 robot vacuum memorizes the floor plan of your home, including where your furniture is. There’s a small camera on the top of the Roomba 980, and this allows it to map and navigate your home. Previous Roombas relied on physical bumpers, infrared, and acoustic sensors to get around.

Must-Read: Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum Doesn’t Faze iRobot

Maybe it’s unfair since iRobot has so much experience in this market, but the Roomba should be the measuring stick for new robot vacuums. And since Sir James Dyson has said the current robot vacuums on the market “are gimmicks,” we want to see how his new Dyson 360 Eye, which took 16 years and more than $46 million to develop, stacks up against the competition.

Check out the side-by-side comparison chart below and let us know which robot vacuum is superior: the iRobot Roomba 980 or Dyson 360 Eye.

 iRobot Roomba 980Dyson 360 Eye
Price$899.99$999
U.S. Availability
YesStarting Aug. 1, 2016
Schedule Cleaning
YesYes
Cleaning Features
Cleans All Floor Types
3-Stage Cleaning Cycle
AeroForce Cleaning System
Carpet Boost
Brushless Extractors
Cleans All Floor Types
Tank Treads for Transitioning Between Surfaces
Full-width Brush Bar
78,000RPM Suction
Carbon-fiber Brushes for Hard Surfaces
Nylon Bristles for Carpets
Battery Type
Rechargeable Lithium ion
Rechargeable Lithium-ion battery
Battery Life
2 hours
45 minutes
Charging Time
Up to 3 hours
2.75 hours
Self-DockingYesYes
Mapping & NavigationiAdapt 2.0 with Visual Localization360 Degree Vision System
Cliff Sensor
YesYes
App Control
Home App (iOS/Android)
Dyson Link (iOS/Android)
Dust Bin
HEPA-filtered bin0.4 liters
Mopping Function
NoNo
Cleaning Path
Parallel Lines
10-Foot Grid Pattern
Side Brush
YesNo, Replaced by Full-width Brush Bar
ShapeCircularCircular
Weight8.7 pounds
5.4 pounds
Size13.8” diameter, 3.6” height9” diameter, 4.72” height
ColorBlack, Gray, BrownNickel, Blue

iRobot Mopping Robots Comparison

iRobot Roomba 980 Overview

Dyson 360 Eye Overview



Comments

saelim · September 1, 2016 · 12:36 am

Great helper, let them do the work so i can have always a clean floor.  Thanks for the invention!  But the price is its main cons.
http://www.ubearymuch.com/dyson-360-eye-robot-vacuum-buy/?preview_id=825&preview_nonce=bb3245b90d&preview=true

TedT · August 19, 2016 · 11:29 pm

When comparing vacuum robots, to me there is just one important fact: Can it go under chairs, table bars near the floor and couches? Without that capability, you will end up going around behind when it has finished doing the easy part (which is exactly what kids do when told to vacuum the home.) I bought the 610 (because of pet hair) and found later it stopped picking up materials. Brush looked OK but the bin was empty. Found it was the brush that had lost a fraction of an inch. Replaced it (and the beater bar) and the machine worked great again. 610 (and others like it from iRobot) are just short enough to fully vacuum under couches and chairs. If you have a pet, that’s absolutely required. Even our Pom manages to squeeze herself under the couch - bad news in the spring. Vacuums under the small overhang of floor cupboards in the kitchen. I don’t see that working with the over-tall Dyson. Height of that robot alone negates usefulness. Not unlike the Dyson ball vacuum - who gives a flying Crap if it has a ball? So does a mutated man. And that ball prevents it from going under furniture as well. It don’t think Lord Dyson gets it yet - especially with his tall robot vacuum that costs $1k. He’s too focused on being without really seriously consider what people want to buy.

Racklefratz · August 13, 2016 · 11:13 am

Mark - If someone wants into my vacuum to fight through all the dog hair, let ‘em have at it. 

Quote: “You don’t have to worry as long as there are no security flaws in the software of your vacuum, your networking equipment and Dyson’s servers.  I don’t know how anyone can know that.”

Sure.  But the same can be said about everything internet-related.  Who knows for sure their account won’t be hacked on any of the servers they visit regularly?  It happens all the time - we know that.  You do what you can to secure things, and you get on with life.  So my Dyson’s out there - if they want it, go for it.

On topic, the Dyson works acceptably well.  My criticisms of it would be a couple of minor nits: First, the “tank tracks” Dyson hypes as making it possible to get around on uneven surfaces also make it possible for the device to climb up just far enough on obstacles to get stuck, and after a few minutes failiing to extricate itself, it shuts off, and has to be freed and restarted.  The other thing is the small dust bin.  It’s really small, compared to the much larger one on our Samsung robot vacuum, which is a real workhorse.  Also, although the Dyson’s dust cup has a max level marking on it, which may be workable for ordinary house dirt/dust, it’s useless for dog hair.  Hair just builds up in one ball in the cup and doesn’t distribute, making emptying a requirement before the cup really fills up.  But it’s vacuuming effectiveness and navigation skills are pretty good, and I’m mostly happy with it.

Mark_K · August 12, 2016 · 7:48 pm

@Racklefratz I’m not the type of person who exploits security flaws.  The people who hack Wi-Fi baby monitors are and there are a lot of them.  You don’t have to worry as long as there are no security flaws in the software of your vacuum, your networking equipment and Dyson’s servers.  I don’t know how anyone can know that.  Dyson’s privacy policy doesn’t say what information their vacuum uploads to their servers.  It does say their internet enabled products may collect and upload information to improve their products.  Of course, the type of information collected can be changed at any time with a software update.  If the vacuum gets stuck, it would certainly be helpful for the vacuum to upload some images of where the vacuum got stuck to help Dyson’s engineers improve the vacuum’s software.

@DonM The US Department of Energy defines a HEPA filter as a filter that removes 99.97% of particles .3 microns in diameter (not .03).  This is small enough to catch bacteria and mold spores.

Racklefratz · August 4, 2016 · 11:47 am

Steve, you’re correct, no interest.  I tend to be a tech early adopter - I bought one of the earliest Roomba’s introduced, and watched it falling off steps in my home as it tried in vain to do anything productive.  In the past couple of years, I’ve owned not only the most recent Roomba available at the time, a Scooba, and a Braava.  The former two are in the landfill; only the Braava remains, and it sees very little use, because it doesn’t do much.  The others were total disasters; flimsy components, and lackluster performance.  The Samsung VR9050UW we own, although somewhat navigation-challenged, is vastly superior to any iRobot product.  I doubt I’ll sink any more money into anything iRobot.  Looking forward to my newest toy, a Dyson 360 Eye, to be delivered today.  But no more Roombas, please.  ; )  Maybe Mark_K will “hack” the Dyson….  jk

Steve Crowe · August 4, 2016 · 10:22 am

Hey Racklefratz,

I’m assuming you’re not interested in the new Roomba 960 either? At least it’s cheaper than the 980.

http://www.roboticstrends.com/article/irobot_roomba_960_vs_roomba_980_robot_vacuum_comparison

Racklefratz · August 1, 2016 · 10:58 am

Not happenin’ here, “Mark”.  All my wireless devices are locked up behind my NAT Router, and none of them are visible on the internet.  I just ordered myself a Dyson 360 Eye, and I’m not the least bit worried about someone “hacking” it, or any of my numerous other wireless devices.  YMMV

Mark_K · July 31, 2016 · 8:00 pm

@Racklefratz The same type of people who hack Wi-Fi baby monitors will hack Wi-Fi vacuums.  Both these vacuums have cameras.  You can do an internet search for “baby monitor hacked” if you don’t think it happens.  When these Wi-Fi products get hacked (and they always do), the propellerheads at the manufacturers blame consumers for not having a network administrator properly secure their network or something like that.  The benefit to the consumer of Wi-Fi connectivity in a vacuum is very small and is not worth the risk.  I’m optimistic that there will eventually be a robot vacuum worth buying, but it will probably take a few more years.

Racklefratz · July 31, 2016 · 12:31 pm

I don’t see the concerns here about wifi-equipped vacuums getting “hacked”.  Who’s going to waste time hacking a vacuum?  What’s the point?  And on Roomba vs *anything*, I’ve owned a previous top-of-the-line model, and it’s in the city landfill.  Dust bin wasn’t large enough, and the entire device was constructed of fragile, non-durable components.  The same is true for the Roomba floor cleaner that uses water.  Cheap, shoddy construction, also in the landfill.  No more Roombas for me, and far as I’m concerned, any place claiming they’re the “best” has a vested interest in doing so.

Mark_K · July 29, 2016 · 6:17 am

@Steve Crowe I will not buy either of these robot vacuums because both of them have network connectivity. It is only a matter of time before they get hacked. I would buy a Dyson 360 Eye if the network connectivity is removed from a future version and it has a HEPA filter as DonM says. The height of the Dyson 360 Eye does not bother me. I prefer better cleaning in the areas I can see than removing dust from under the sofa.

I have a Neato XV-21 robot vacuum ($300 from Amazon). I expect the Dyson to clean better but the network connectivity on the Dyson is not acceptable to me. Given the height of the Dyson, I am surprised that the dust bin is only .4 liters. The dust bin on the Neato XV-21 is .6 liters, which is still too small in my opinion. I think some kind of automatic dust bin emptying accessory is needed for robot vacuums to be popular with people who don’t like doing cleaning. This accessory could be something that connects to a customer-supplied canister vacuum or shop vacuum (to keep the cost low) or a central vacuum system.

DonM · July 28, 2016 · 5:19 pm

Would Like to add, I just talked with Dyson and the 360 DOES have a Hepa filter. The Roomba DOES NOT.

Steve Crowe · July 28, 2016 · 1:16 pm

Mark, so would you buy a Dyson 360 Eye? The biggest gripe I’ve seen is that it doesn’t fit under couches, some chairs, etc., and those are usually some of the dirtiest spots. Does a great job cleaning the spots it can reach though.

DonM · July 28, 2016 · 11:54 am

Mark_K

I would just like to point out that Roomba has been lying about their filters. Notice how they have dropped the word Hepa in all their material? The specs for hepa are .03 micros, roomba is now claiming their filters are good only to 10 microns.

Steve Crowe · July 25, 2016 · 10:39 am

Love the idea of somehow connecting robot vacuums to central vac systems. I have a central vac system, love the convenience and only periodically having to empty the bin. I’ve read complaints about the height of the 360 Eye not allowing it to fit under couches, which often are the dirtiest spots.

Mark_K · July 23, 2016 · 8:05 pm

I see three problems with these robot vacuums:

1. Both these products are a security risk because they connect to Wi-Fi. Making software upgrades easy is not worth the security risk of having a Wi-Fi connected camera in the home. A better approach would be to put a small display and a few buttons on the robot so use of a smartphone would not be needed. Most customers should not have to upgrade the software in their vacuum. If a software upgrade is really wanted, this could be done via an SD card, which would not expose the customer to the risk of images being uploaded.

2. The Dyson 360 Eye should have a HEPA filter.

3. Both these products should have an optional docking accessory that automatically empties the robot’s dust bin.  Ideally, this docking accessory should be able to connect to a central vacuum system.

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Mark_K · July 23, 2016 at 8:05 pm

I see three problems with these robot vacuums:

1. Both these products are a security risk because they connect to Wi-Fi. Making software upgrades easy is not worth the security risk of having a Wi-Fi connected camera in the home. A better approach would be to put a small display and a few buttons on the robot so use of a smartphone would not be needed. Most customers should not have to upgrade the software in their vacuum. If a software upgrade is really wanted, this could be done via an SD card, which would not expose the customer to the risk of images being uploaded.

2. The Dyson 360 Eye should have a HEPA filter.

3. Both these products should have an optional docking accessory that automatically empties the robot’s dust bin.  Ideally, this docking accessory should be able to connect to a central vacuum system.

Steve Crowe · July 25, 2016 at 10:39 am

Love the idea of somehow connecting robot vacuums to central vac systems. I have a central vac system, love the convenience and only periodically having to empty the bin. I’ve read complaints about the height of the 360 Eye not allowing it to fit under couches, which often are the dirtiest spots.

DonM · July 28, 2016 at 11:54 am

Mark_K

I would just like to point out that Roomba has been lying about their filters. Notice how they have dropped the word Hepa in all their material? The specs for hepa are .03 micros, roomba is now claiming their filters are good only to 10 microns.

Steve Crowe · July 28, 2016 at 1:16 pm

Mark, so would you buy a Dyson 360 Eye? The biggest gripe I’ve seen is that it doesn’t fit under couches, some chairs, etc., and those are usually some of the dirtiest spots. Does a great job cleaning the spots it can reach though.

DonM · July 28, 2016 at 5:19 pm

Would Like to add, I just talked with Dyson and the 360 DOES have a Hepa filter. The Roomba DOES NOT.

Mark_K · July 29, 2016 at 6:17 am

@Steve Crowe I will not buy either of these robot vacuums because both of them have network connectivity. It is only a matter of time before they get hacked. I would buy a Dyson 360 Eye if the network connectivity is removed from a future version and it has a HEPA filter as DonM says. The height of the Dyson 360 Eye does not bother me. I prefer better cleaning in the areas I can see than removing dust from under the sofa.

I have a Neato XV-21 robot vacuum ($300 from Amazon). I expect the Dyson to clean better but the network connectivity on the Dyson is not acceptable to me. Given the height of the Dyson, I am surprised that the dust bin is only .4 liters. The dust bin on the Neato XV-21 is .6 liters, which is still too small in my opinion. I think some kind of automatic dust bin emptying accessory is needed for robot vacuums to be popular with people who don’t like doing cleaning. This accessory could be something that connects to a customer-supplied canister vacuum or shop vacuum (to keep the cost low) or a central vacuum system.

Racklefratz · July 31, 2016 at 12:31 pm

I don’t see the concerns here about wifi-equipped vacuums getting “hacked”.  Who’s going to waste time hacking a vacuum?  What’s the point?  And on Roomba vs *anything*, I’ve owned a previous top-of-the-line model, and it’s in the city landfill.  Dust bin wasn’t large enough, and the entire device was constructed of fragile, non-durable components.  The same is true for the Roomba floor cleaner that uses water.  Cheap, shoddy construction, also in the landfill.  No more Roombas for me, and far as I’m concerned, any place claiming they’re the “best” has a vested interest in doing so.

Mark_K · July 31, 2016 at 8:00 pm

@Racklefratz The same type of people who hack Wi-Fi baby monitors will hack Wi-Fi vacuums.  Both these vacuums have cameras.  You can do an internet search for “baby monitor hacked” if you don’t think it happens.  When these Wi-Fi products get hacked (and they always do), the propellerheads at the manufacturers blame consumers for not having a network administrator properly secure their network or something like that.  The benefit to the consumer of Wi-Fi connectivity in a vacuum is very small and is not worth the risk.  I’m optimistic that there will eventually be a robot vacuum worth buying, but it will probably take a few more years.

Racklefratz · August 1, 2016 at 10:58 am

Not happenin’ here, “Mark”.  All my wireless devices are locked up behind my NAT Router, and none of them are visible on the internet.  I just ordered myself a Dyson 360 Eye, and I’m not the least bit worried about someone “hacking” it, or any of my numerous other wireless devices.  YMMV

Steve Crowe · August 4, 2016 at 10:22 am

Hey Racklefratz,

I’m assuming you’re not interested in the new Roomba 960 either? At least it’s cheaper than the 980.

http://www.roboticstrends.com/article/irobot_roomba_960_vs_roomba_980_robot_vacuum_comparison

Racklefratz · August 4, 2016 at 11:47 am

Steve, you’re correct, no interest.  I tend to be a tech early adopter - I bought one of the earliest Roomba’s introduced, and watched it falling off steps in my home as it tried in vain to do anything productive.  In the past couple of years, I’ve owned not only the most recent Roomba available at the time, a Scooba, and a Braava.  The former two are in the landfill; only the Braava remains, and it sees very little use, because it doesn’t do much.  The others were total disasters; flimsy components, and lackluster performance.  The Samsung VR9050UW we own, although somewhat navigation-challenged, is vastly superior to any iRobot product.  I doubt I’ll sink any more money into anything iRobot.  Looking forward to my newest toy, a Dyson 360 Eye, to be delivered today.  But no more Roombas, please.  ; )  Maybe Mark_K will “hack” the Dyson….  jk

Mark_K · August 12, 2016 at 7:48 pm

@Racklefratz I’m not the type of person who exploits security flaws.  The people who hack Wi-Fi baby monitors are and there are a lot of them.  You don’t have to worry as long as there are no security flaws in the software of your vacuum, your networking equipment and Dyson’s servers.  I don’t know how anyone can know that.  Dyson’s privacy policy doesn’t say what information their vacuum uploads to their servers.  It does say their internet enabled products may collect and upload information to improve their products.  Of course, the type of information collected can be changed at any time with a software update.  If the vacuum gets stuck, it would certainly be helpful for the vacuum to upload some images of where the vacuum got stuck to help Dyson’s engineers improve the vacuum’s software.

@DonM The US Department of Energy defines a HEPA filter as a filter that removes 99.97% of particles .3 microns in diameter (not .03).  This is small enough to catch bacteria and mold spores.

Racklefratz · August 13, 2016 at 11:13 am

Mark - If someone wants into my vacuum to fight through all the dog hair, let ‘em have at it. 

Quote: “You don’t have to worry as long as there are no security flaws in the software of your vacuum, your networking equipment and Dyson’s servers.  I don’t know how anyone can know that.”

Sure.  But the same can be said about everything internet-related.  Who knows for sure their account won’t be hacked on any of the servers they visit regularly?  It happens all the time - we know that.  You do what you can to secure things, and you get on with life.  So my Dyson’s out there - if they want it, go for it.

On topic, the Dyson works acceptably well.  My criticisms of it would be a couple of minor nits: First, the “tank tracks” Dyson hypes as making it possible to get around on uneven surfaces also make it possible for the device to climb up just far enough on obstacles to get stuck, and after a few minutes failiing to extricate itself, it shuts off, and has to be freed and restarted.  The other thing is the small dust bin.  It’s really small, compared to the much larger one on our Samsung robot vacuum, which is a real workhorse.  Also, although the Dyson’s dust cup has a max level marking on it, which may be workable for ordinary house dirt/dust, it’s useless for dog hair.  Hair just builds up in one ball in the cup and doesn’t distribute, making emptying a requirement before the cup really fills up.  But it’s vacuuming effectiveness and navigation skills are pretty good, and I’m mostly happy with it.

TedT · August 19, 2016 at 11:29 pm

When comparing vacuum robots, to me there is just one important fact: Can it go under chairs, table bars near the floor and couches? Without that capability, you will end up going around behind when it has finished doing the easy part (which is exactly what kids do when told to vacuum the home.) I bought the 610 (because of pet hair) and found later it stopped picking up materials. Brush looked OK but the bin was empty. Found it was the brush that had lost a fraction of an inch. Replaced it (and the beater bar) and the machine worked great again. 610 (and others like it from iRobot) are just short enough to fully vacuum under couches and chairs. If you have a pet, that’s absolutely required. Even our Pom manages to squeeze herself under the couch - bad news in the spring. Vacuums under the small overhang of floor cupboards in the kitchen. I don’t see that working with the over-tall Dyson. Height of that robot alone negates usefulness. Not unlike the Dyson ball vacuum - who gives a flying Crap if it has a ball? So does a mutated man. And that ball prevents it from going under furniture as well. It don’t think Lord Dyson gets it yet - especially with his tall robot vacuum that costs $1k. He’s too focused on being without really seriously consider what people want to buy.

saelim · September 1, 2016 at 12:36 am

Great helper, let them do the work so i can have always a clean floor.  Thanks for the invention!  But the price is its main cons.
http://www.ubearymuch.com/dyson-360-eye-robot-vacuum-buy/?preview_id=825&preview_nonce=bb3245b90d&preview=true

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