FAA Bans Drones at Super Bowl 50

If you're anywhere in the vicinity of Super Bowl 50 on February 7, please leave your drone at home.

Photo Caption: A look at the no-fly zones that will be in place for Super Bowl 50 on February 7, 2016 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo Credit: Federal Aviation Administration)

In case you needed a reminder, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is banning drones from flying anywhere near Super Bowl 50 on February 7 at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California.

The FAA is shutting down airspace up to 17,999 and within a 32-mile radius of Levi’s Stadium from 2 PM to midnight on game-day.  There‚Äôs another 11.5-mile radius closer to the stadium the FAA is putting an even bigger emphasis on.

The FAA has set up a website, FlytoSuperBowl50.org, where people can find information about where not to fly. The information could change as Super Bowl 50 gets closer, the FAA says.

Again, this really shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone as drones have been banned from flying above sporting events since at least 2014. Here’s some details on those restrictions, courtesy NOTAM FDC 4/3621:

All aircraft operations; including parachute jumping, unmanned aircraft and remote controlled aircraft, are prohibited within a 3 NMR up to and including 3000 FT AGL of any stadium having a seating capacity of 30,000 or more people where either a regular or post season Major League Baseball, National Football League, or NCAA division one football game is occurring. This NOTAM also applies to NASCAR Sprint Cup, Indy Car, and Champ Series races excluding qualifying and pre-race events.

Drones were somewhat of a concern for security officials in 2015 at Super Bowl XLIX in Glendale, Ariz. Drones were banned within 30 miles of Super Bowl XLIX, and officials were ready to close the roof on University of Phoenix Stadium if there was a suspicious drone nearby. Security officials admitted the concern about terrorists using drone was “pretty small” and that the “real threat” was over a hobbyist crashing a drone into a crowd of people.

In September 2015, a teacher was arrested for crashing a drone into an empty section of seats during a second-round match at the US Open. Drones are banned within five miles of an airport, and Louis Armstrong Stadium sits 4.2 miles from LaGuardia Airport. Nobody was injured during the incident

Moral of the story: if you’re anywhere in the vicinity of Levi’s Stadium on February 7, 2016, it’s probably a good idea to leave your drone at home.




About the Author

Steve Crowe · Steve Crowe is managing editor of Robotics Trends. Steve has been writing about technology since 2008. He lives in Belchertown, MA with his wife and daughter.
Contact Steve Crowe: scrowe@ehpub.com  ·  View More by Steve Crowe.




Comments

Totally_Lost · January 24, 2016 · 11:49 am

the 3 NMR rule does make sense ... The 30 and 37 NMR for larger aircraft also makes sense post post 9/11. But applying that to small hobby RC aircraft at 37 NMR is ridiculous.

We already know that people murder when it’s against the law, and terrorists are not concerned about the law either. If they are going to deploy a drone bomb, it’s very likely going to be from a location close in to minimize it’s detection and interception. This really is a case where the US government needs some drone interceptors that can be deployed within a few hundred foot radius of large events like this.

There is no reason to disrupt the lives of a few million people that don’t care about the game, and just want to take their kids to the park and fly their RC airplane/drone


Totally_Lost · January 24, 2016 at 11:49 am

the 3 NMR rule does make sense ... The 30 and 37 NMR for larger aircraft also makes sense post post 9/11. But applying that to small hobby RC aircraft at 37 NMR is ridiculous.

We already know that people murder when it’s against the law, and terrorists are not concerned about the law either. If they are going to deploy a drone bomb, it’s very likely going to be from a location close in to minimize it’s detection and interception. This really is a case where the US government needs some drone interceptors that can be deployed within a few hundred foot radius of large events like this.

There is no reason to disrupt the lives of a few million people that don’t care about the game, and just want to take their kids to the park and fly their RC airplane/drone


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