Talking Exoskeletons with suitX Founder Dr. Homayoon Kazerooni

Dr. Kazerooni on how to bring lightweight, affordable exoskeletons to everyone who needs one.

Photo Caption: The suitX Phoenix exoskeleton has a 4-hour battery life for continuous walking, an 8-hour battery life for intermittent use and a maximum walking speed of 1.1 MPH. (Photos: suitX)

California-based suitX is well on its way to disrupting the exoskeleton industry. Not only has the company developed its Phoenix exoskeleton, which is the least expensive and among the lightest medical exoskeletons available, but suitX also just won the $1 million first-place prize at the UAE’s AI & Robotics for Good Award with its proposal for a pediatric medical exoskeleton, beating out 659 other entries into the event’s international category.

suitX was founded by Dr. Homayoon Kazerooni, who has more than 30 years of mechanical engineering experience and a doctorate degree from MIT. In fact, Dr. Kazerooni even co-founded Ekso Bionics.

We caught up with Dr. Kazerooni to get his insights on how to bring lightweight, affordable exoskeletons to everyone who needs one. We also discussed the role insurance companies play in the exoskeleton industry and, of course, suitX’s Phoenix exoskeleton that’s due out in March 2016.

Listen to the podcast using the embedded player below.




Listen to the podcast using the embedded player below.

Listen to this podcast

Podcast rundown

  • Hosts: Steve Crowe, Dr. Homayoon Kazerooni
  • Duration: 20:13
  • Lightweight Design of Phoenix Exoskeleton: 1:00
  • Weight Doesn’t Compromise Functionality: 3:52
  • Role of Insurance Companies: 6:13
  • suitX Wins AI & Robotics Award for Good: 10:22
  • Student Involvement at UC Berkeley: 15:15
  • The Future of Exoskeletons: 16:32


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