Love robotics? Fill out the form below to stay
abreast of the latest news, research, and business
analysis in key areas of the fast-changing
robotics industry
Subscribe to Robotics
Trends Insights


 
Sponsored Links

Advertise with Robotics Trends
[ view all ]
Research and Academics
Bookmark and Share
STORY TOOLBOX Print this story  |   Email to a friend  |   RSS feeds
MIT Builds Voice-Controlled Robotic Wheelchair
Wheelchair can understand natural, conversational language that users feed it through a standard headset and microphone.
By Dylan Love, Business Insider - Filed Apr 16, 2014

More Research and Academics stories
Working out of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Matt Walter and Sachi Hemachandra have built something that could revolutionize the way people with progressive neurological conditions get from place to place — it's a robotic wheelchair that understands basic voice commands for navigating around a space.

After building a map of its surroundings and being taught the location of each room — where the kitchen is, where the bathrooms are — the wheelchair can understand natural, conversational language that the users feed it through a standard headset and microphone.

This includes direct commands ("Take me to the kitchen.") and more subtle input as well ("I'm hungry."). Even though it already knows the layout of its space, it also has rangefinders at approximately ankle height to ensure it doesn't bump into people or other obstacles.

The team employed Amazon's Mechanical Turk platform to help the wheelchair understand the wide variety of input it could get from users. Mechanical Turk is a service that lets you pay a small fee to have humans do things that computers can't yet do reliably, like write product descriptions or pick out the most aesthetically pleasing photograph from among a set. People on the other end of the service watched videos of the wheelchair carrying out a number of tasks, then came up with the possible commands that might have caused the action to be carried out.

For example, in response to a video of the wheelchair going into a bedroom, Mechanical Turk providers would type "Take me to the bedroom" or "Take me to bed" or "I'm tired" or whatever else is appropriate. This effectively builds out the wheelchair's vocabulary and makes sure it always knows what its users want to do.

This system will prove invaluable to people who retain the ability to speak but can't use a joystick to effectively steer their chair. With a quick verbal command, they're off to their destinations.
The wheelchair team is already working with The Boston Home, an area care center for people with progressive neurological diseases, to see how this technology can benefit its residents.

Bookmark and Share
STORY TOOLBOX Print this story  |   Email to a friend  |   RSS feeds
  FOLLOW US
Facebook
Now you can follow Robotics Trends and
Robotics Trends Business Review on Facebook