Love robotics? Fill out the form below to stay
abreast of the latest news, research, and business
analysis in key areas of the fast-changing
robotics industry
Subscribe to Robotics
Trends Insights


 
Sponsored Links

Advertise with Robotics Trends
[ view all ]
Research and Academics
Bookmark and Share
STORY TOOLBOX Print this story  |   Email to a friend  |   RSS feeds
UCI Robot to Aid Brain Research
Robot using model of a rodent brain used to study human decision making.
By Robotics Trends Staff - Filed Nov 04, 2009

UCI cognitive scientist Jeffrey Krichmar (right) and former Hollywood animatronics engineer Brian Cox designed CARL to think and act like a human being. The small, squat robot is central to a new $1.6 million joint study with UC San Diego. Photo by Daniel A. Anderson / University Communications

More Research and Academics stories
Researchers from the University of California Irvine and University of California San Diego study adaptive decision-making in humans using a robot controlled by a computer model of a rodent brain.



A robot powered by a computerized model of a rodent brain will help researchers from UC Irvine and UC San Diego understand how people recognize and adapt to change.

The $1.6 million joint study is expected to provide neuron-level insight about the specific brain areas responsible for decision-making and attention, advancing robotic design as well as knowledge of human behavior. 

“Little is known about the areas of the brain involved in making decisions when faced with uncertainty,” said Jeffrey Krichmar, a UCI cognitive scientist and one of the study’s lead researchers.

Krichmar specializes in neurorobotics, or programming robots with real-life organic and neural data to simulate thinking, moving beings. His work with CARL – a robot with a biologically plausible nervous system controlled by a realistic model of the human brain – has led to several advances in the field, the most recent of which are featured in the September issue of IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine.

Collaborating with Krichmar are UCSD researchers Andrea Chiba, Douglas Nitz and Angela Yu, who will develop the data for the study by testing the decision-making abilities of rodents during a task in which the locations of stimuli that predict food rewards change abruptly, requiring the rats to adapt to the new environment in order to receive food rewards.

Brain recordings taken from the rodents during the task will be digitally analyzed and programmed into CARL’s software-controlled “brain,” enabling the robot to replicate the same behavior. 

“We know the areas of the brain supposedly involved in predicting and adapting to uncertainty, but getting a complete picture of what happens in a real human brain isn’t technically feasible,” Krichmar said.

“As the robot navigates the same challenging situations the rats faced, though, we’ll be able to actually see the areas of the simulated human brain being utilized to make decisions and the physical changes taking place.”

In addition to potential health applications, study findings are expected to advance the field of robotics, facilitating development of a brain-based algorithm letting robots behave effectively in complex and variable environments. 

The three-year study, funded by the National Science Foundation, began in September, with UCI and UCSD each awarded $800,000.

About the University of California, Irvine
Founded in 1965, UCI is a top-ranked university dedicated to research, scholarship and community service. Led by Chancellor Michael Drake since 2005, UCI is among the fastest-growing University of California campuses, with more than 27,000 undergraduate and graduate students, 1,100 faculty and 9,200 staff. The top employer in dynamic Orange County, UCI contributes an annual economic impact of $4.2 billion. For more UCI news, visit http://www.today.uci.edu.

Robotics Trends would like to thank the University of California Irvine for permission to reprint this article.  The original article can be found at http://today.uci.edu/news/nr_robotbrain_091104.php.


Bookmark and Share
STORY TOOLBOX Print this story  |   Email to a friend  |   RSS feeds
  FOLLOW US
Facebook
Now you can follow Robotics Trends and
Robotics Trends Business Review on Facebook