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Mars Rover Opportunity Checks Out Intrepid Crater
Opportunity has traveled 15 miles on the Red Planet thus far, and just spent a few days imaging the interior of Intrepid crater.
By Robotics Trends Staff - Filed Nov 29, 2010

A rendering of the Martian surface.

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Mars rover Opportunity has been navigating through a field of small impact craters on her way to Endeavour crater. Opportunity has now exceeded 25 kilometers (15 miles) of odometry on the surface of the Red Planet.

Opportunity spent a few days imaging the interior of Intrepid crater, one of a collection of small impact craters in this area. On November 14, 2010, the rover departed Intrepid, driving more than 116 meters (381 feet) and crossing the 25-kilometer odometry mark. During the drive, the rover collected some mid-drive imaging of Intrepid from a different vantage point.

Spirit Remains Silent at Troy
Spirit remains silent at her location on the west side of Home Plate, a raised and layered outcrop on the Martian surface. No communication has been received from the rover since March 22, 2010.

Spirit and Opportunity landed on Mars in January 2004 for what were planned as three-month missions. Bonus, extended missions have continued for more than six years. Because it is still active, Opportunity requires daily activity plans by a team of engineers at NASA JPL and scientists at many locations in North America and Europe. Spirit is believed to be in a low-power hibernation mode for the Martian winter.

The project continues to listen for Spirit with the Deep Space Network and Mars Odyssey orbiter for autonomous recovery communication from the low-power fault case. The project is also conducting a paging technique called “sweep and beep” to stimulate the rover in the case of a mission-clock fault.


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